Do Africans Value Women’s Day: The Truth

Today March 8, 2019 is International Women’s Day, a day set aside to celebrate woman. Mostly marked by women right campaign and protest. 1 min


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HOW IT ALL CAME ABOUT;

After the Socialist Party of America organized a Women’s Day on February 28, 1909, in New York, the 1910 International Socialist Woman’s Conference suggested a Women’s Day be held annually. 

After women gained suffrage in Soviet Russia in 1917, March 8 became a national holiday there, and then later adopted by the United Nations in1975.

Today, International Women’s Day is a public holiday in some countries and largely ignored In most African countries.

While other countries use this day to protest and to celebrates womanhood.

Last year Spain made world headlines when it staged a general strike on March 8, International Women’s Day. Around 5.3 million women observed the walkout, according to the unions, while hundreds of thousands of people joined marches on the streets of 120 Spanish cities that day.

A protestor with a sign reading: “I wnat to stop being afraid! Enough is enough.” ÁLVARO GARCÍA

ÁLVARO GARCÍA

Today March 8, 2019 spain is already doing another “feminist strike” and more than 500 street demonstrations. In Madrid and Barcelona, students are planning a march at noon, and wider demonstrations are scheduled in both cities in the evening.

Feminists in Galicia last weekend during a warm-up event for today’s strike. ELISEO TRIGOEFE

ELISEO TRIGO

Back to Africa;

Many African countries like Nigeria, Kenya, Egypt and the rest exception of South Africa has maintained March 8 for women’s day. But without a holiday, the day seems to be like every other working day, as business men and employees still carry out their individual duties like every other day.

Though some African are sharing their gratitude for women today;

South Africa Women’s Day

National Women's Day is a South African public holiday celebrated annually on 9 August. The day commemorates the 1956 march of approximately 20,000 women to the Union Buildings in Pretoria to petition against the country's pass laws that required South Africans defined as "black" under The Population Registration Act to carry an internal passport, known as a pass, that served to maintain population segregation, control urbanisation, and manage migrant labour during the apartheid era. The first National Women's Day was celebrated on 9 August 1994.

Pan African Women's day is observed each year on 31st July

African Union has designated 31 July as African Women’s Day.

“This is how the RPMM(The Regional Prevention of Maternal & Neonatal Mortality) Network will be celebrating African Women’s Day,”  Angela Sawyer said.



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